WOTCLEF reiterates commitment to fighting child trafficking, labour

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ABUJA – The Women Trafficking and Child Labour Eradication Foundation (WOTCLEF) on Tuesday reiterated its commitment to reducing the scourge of child trafficking and labour in the country.

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WOTCLEF National Coordinator, Mrs Veronica Umaru, told the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Abuja that there was an increase in cases of trafficking, saying “it is worrisome’’.

“We are more committed to sensitising people and making them know how to identify any child that is being trafficked and report to authorities appropriately.”

“The rate of child trafficking in Nigeria is still very high, when we talk about trafficking; it is not only about young women going to European countries.

“We are also talking about children being trafficked daily from the rural areas to the urban cities like the FCT,  as house helps, beggars, hawkers, mechanics and all sorts of exploitation,” she said.

Umaru refuted the claim that anti trafficking awareness had made children not to have respect for constituted authorities, saying “WOTCLEF also teaches children their responsibilities’’.

She said it was not the group’s desire for an outright ban against  house helps, saying efforts should be geared toward their education and full integration as members of the society.

“WOTCLEF does not talk about only children’s rights but their responsibilities as well, we go back to our culture to advise the children to respect and help their parents and the society at large.

“We are not calling for a total ban of house helps because some families truly care for them, but couples who don’t, we urge them to treat these children as theirs because it is their right and is ideal for every child,’’ she stressed.

Umaru said there was need for more awareness and re-orientation on trafficking issues, saying many Nigerians believe sending a child to hawk in the street was part of culture.

She advised stakeholders to encourage children to participate in the fight against human trafficking and child labour.

“We need to continue to talk about this issue; it is not a one-way thing, everyone has a part to play; children are the future, so let us come together and put a stop to these acts.”

Umar said that in spite of the enactment of the Child Rights Act in 2003, lack of proper implementation and enforcement had allowed the menace to continue. (NAN)

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Trafficking
Abuja, April 1, 2014 (NAN) The Women Trafficking and Child Labour Eradication Foundation (WOTCLEF) on Tuesday reiterated its commitment to reducing the scourge of child trafficking and labour in the country.

WOTCLEF National Coordinator, Mrs Veronica Umaru, told the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Abuja that there was an increase in cases of trafficking, saying “it is worrisome’’.

“We are more committed to sensitising people and making them know how to identify any child that is being trafficked and report to authorities appropriately.”

“The rate of child trafficking in Nigeria is still very high, when we talk about trafficking; it is not only about young women going to European countries.

“We are also talking about children being trafficked daily from the rural areas to the urban cities like the FCT,  as house helps, beggars, hawkers, mechanics and all sorts of exploitation,” she said.

Umaru refuted the claim that anti trafficking awareness had made children not to have respect for constituted authorities, saying “WOTCLEF also teaches children their responsibilities’’.

She said it was not the group’s desire for an outright ban against  house helps, saying efforts should be geared toward their education and full integration as members of the society.

“WOTCLEF does not talk about only children’s rights but their responsibilities as well, we go back to our culture to advise the children to respect and help their parents and the society at large.

“We are not calling for a total ban of house helps because some families truly care for them, but couples who don’t, we urge them to treat these children as theirs because it is their right and is ideal for every child,’’ she stressed.

Umaru said there was need for more awareness and re-orientation on trafficking issues, saying many Nigerians believe sending a child to hawk in the street was part of culture.

She advised stakeholders to encourage children to participate in the fight against human trafficking and child labour.

“We need to continue to talk about this issue; it is not a one-way thing, everyone has a part to play; children are the future, so let us come together and put a stop to these acts.”

Umar said that in spite of the enactment of the Child Rights Act in 2003, lack of proper implementation and enforcement had allowed the menace to continue. (NAN)


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